New nutrition challenge in Europe & Central Asia

New nutrition challenge in Europe & Central Asia

The report states, people in countries need to consider whether they consume enough calories, as well as focus more on balanced and healthy diets, especially for children.

The latest report by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) warns that new food consumption patterns in European and Central Asian countries are leading to the Complex health challenges. The FAO calls for policies that are consistent with the income and nutrition profiles of developed countries to prevent them from moving to new food insecurity and nutritional status.

People in countries need to consider whether they consume enough calories, as well as focus more on balanced and healthy diets, especially for children.

“When we monitor dietary patterns of income, we notice that the portion of calories derived from the sweetener,” says David Sedik, FAO economist and author of the report. , vegetable oil and animal products are on the rise, while calories from cereals are down. ”

According to FAO, major malnutrition has been remedied in these areas, with only 7% of the population living in countries with nutritional problems, primarily malnourished and micronutrients. . Notably, malnutrition due to deficiencies of micronutrients such as iron, vitamin A, zinc and over-nutrition problems such as overweight and obesity are still present and increasing.

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Today, 13% of the population in Europe and Central Asia live in countries that are facing a “triple burden” of nutrition, malnutrition, micronutrient deficiencies and over-nutrition. Of particular concern is that 57% of people living in the main problem countries are overweight and 70% of the malnourished population.

“Undernutrition countries are tending to shift to the triad of nutritional burden in the coming years,” FAO said.

In addressing these challenges, the FAO report calls for the understanding of policies that address food insecurity, in line with national income and nutritional profiles.

Some of them are fortified foods, such as vitamin D fortified milk, iodized salt, iron, folic acid and thiamine (vitamin B1). In addition, the bioavailability solution can be used to offset relatively low levels of micronutrients in wheat in Central Asia and the Caucasus where cereals supply over 50% of energy in the diet.

Other options may include changing instant foods to improve nutritional value; Implement taxes or subsidies to change food prices; popular for people on the importance of healthy, balanced and balanced diet; better nutritional labeling for food products; as well as food assistance programs including purchase promotion cards.

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